The middle bit is the tricky bit- AXA PPP healthcare Facing my own Fears

Napoleon and I have one or two things in common. I’m not a short French dictator with a complex but I’m pretty rubbish at a war of attrition, and good old Napoleon did rather famously fail in his invasion of Russia. Facing my big fear- my own mortality, and doing something about it- is in many ways akin to invading Russia. The first bit is easy but then all you see is the enormity of it and feel trouble – but it doesn’t have to be this way if you can just see past the initial panic.

Fortunately I’ve not been driven to eating my own horse. That’s probably because I don’t have a horse mind you.

Feeling galvanised from my first conversation with Becky from the AXA PPP healthcare team, I finally got around to booking my 40+ health check at the doctors. Only three years too late but you know me, never put off until tomorrow what you can put off indefinitely. My fear of being told something was seriously wrong with me (I’m quite a bit overweight) made it much easier to avoid. But now I’m into the swing of facing my fears and using them to motivate myself, I thought it was entirely the right time.

So imagine my surprise when I received a phone call a few days after having my blood tests asking me to come in immediately as I was a high risk of diabetes. I happened to take the call while taking the cat to the vets to have the pus drained from a bite on his head, so couldn’t go in immediately. And the doctors being the doctors, immediately didn’t have the option of not quite immediately but very soon anyway. No, I had a wait of a week which reduced me to a nervous wreck. Fortunately I was able to draw on the expert help of Becky from AXA PPP healthcare, who as well as being a physiologist, also happens to be a pre-diabetes councillor.

Becky was able to talk me down from the cliff I’d put myself on (metaphorically, I’m scared of heights too), and pointed out that one in three people are actually pre-diabetic and there were some really practical steps I could take right away. For me fear is quite strongly rooted in passivity and the inability to effect outcomes, so having something practical to do before I saw the GP really really helped me. Sometimes you need a little help to own your own fears, and AXA PPP healthcare were able to provide that.

The biggest problem I have generally when it comes to achieving any goal is keeping the focus and not either backsliding or losing interest over a period of time. I have a short attention span, and even less sticking power. About the only thing I ever really finish are books, and I’ve lost count of the number of video games I’ve only ever played the tutorial on (hint: it’s most of the video games I’ve ever played).

That’s not to say I’m lazy (although my wife might disagree!) but I don’t easily see things through. For example if you were to ask me how good I thought Breaking Bad was, I’d tell you it was utterly fantastic and one of the best TV shows I’ve seen. I’d then go on to tell you that I got as far as episode six of season two and never got round to watching the rest of it for some reason or other. I am terrible.

This is were Becky at AXA PPP healthcare has really helped. Being held accountable, especially to someone I don’t really know, has helped me stay focused and the scare over being potentially diabetic has also played it’s part too. Knowing that I’m still in the woods as it were, and not free in the open has a certain immediacy to it that is helping.

With regard to the targets we set last month (get down to under 100KG, eat better lunches, and the third one?) I’m slowly getting there. I’ve lost three kilos in total, despite being busier at work and in the office longer. I’ve also enjoyed some great left overs and had some positive comments from others over what I’ve been scoffing. I’ve even managed to cut down the drinking significantly, not that it was excessive to begin with mind, but it all helps doesn’t it?

If you’ve been putting off something like a check up or a well being check, I can heartily recommend you grab the bull by the horns and make that appointment now. The simple fact you’re actually doing something will actually be empowering because the fear of being afraid of what you don’t know can’t be any worse than the fear of what you do know and are dealing with!

Lego City Mining Review and Giveaway With Smyths

It’s easy to get sucked into buying branded LEGO sets; I’ve got a big stack of Star Wars and Marvel Superhero sets stashed away for birthdays and rewards for the kids but Smyths have popped up with a timely reminder that their is fun in the LEGO universe outside of the film and TV tie ins with some LEGO City for review and another set for a giveaway!

LEGO City Mining is a sub set of LEGO City that focuses on the big rigs that, surprise!, do mining. All the characters come equipped with hard hats and some of the machinery is really cool- rock smashers, a tunneller with counter rotating drill bits at the front– and you can even recreate the Indiana Jones mine cart chase in miniature because there is a mine cart set too.

The boy and Fifi spent a fun filled weekend building a lot of bright yellow digging equipment and if you would like your little ones to build a lot of bright yellow digging equipment, now is your chance because Symths Toys have kindly given another set of the, um, sets to me to give away (LEGO City Mining sets 60184, 60185, 60186 and 60188).

a Rafflecopter giveaway

  • UK only
  • Winner chosen at random via rafflecopter
  • Prize is one LEGO CITY MINING BUNDLE worth £140 – No alternatives will be offered
  • The winner will be notified within seven days of the competition closing
  • The winner has 14 days to claim their prize after notification. If the winner fails to claim their prize within 14 days an alternative winner will be chosen

Gearing up for some DIY

Previous bank holidays have been busy

Next week sees a long Bank Holiday weekend and that can only mean one thing- DIY. I’m not sure why adults across the country see long weekends as an ideal opportunity to go stuff around the house instead of sitting around watching football and F1 but we do, and I’m invested in the process as much as other people.

Our big task this Bank Holiday is going to be emptying the loft and getting rid of most of the stuff in it. The things will be divided into keep, sell, charity shop and take to the dump. I’m hoping the first pile will be the smallest. It’s been something we’ve been meaning to do as I’ve wanted to replace all the loft insulation for a while now. Insulating a loft can be tricky, and once you’ve piled a load of loft boards and boxes on top of the insulation like we have, it doesn’t really provide much actual insulation.

This winter was in places a really cold one and since we had our energy meter fitted I’ve pathologically resented having the heating any higher than it should be. And given I’ve got a Nest thermostat, I can check what it’s been set to really easily! There’s not much point having cavity wall insulation if all the heat can escape through the roof.

Once we get that done though, there are still several other things that need doing. In the recent cold snap we had a burst pipe (to an outside tap). This is the first burst pipe we’ve ever suffered and I think it probably got in the wall cavity before it was spotted. Fortunately we have an isolation value on the tap but it has meant that we’ve had a damp section of wall which I’ve been waiting to dry out before skimming it repainting it. If I can face the rolling digits on the energy meter, I might just put a fan heater on it to speed the process up.

We’ve also been in the process of replacing some of our curtains and net curtains with roman blinds and roller blinds. We’ve had issues with curtain poles in the past due to over engineering in the actual house construct- the concrete lintels over the windows are massive and my Bosch power drill hasn’t managed to even dent them. This has meant we’ve had to screw wooden batons part into the wall, and no more nails them for extra strength. This doesn’t look tidy so I’ve finally bit the bullet and bought an SDS drill which goes through the concrete like a hot knife through butter. It’s similar to this one from Ferm  and a complete beast of a drill. It’s slightly terrifying to use but gets the job done nicely, so we’re now in the process of sorting out all the windows. So far I’m pleased with the results:

One room down- many more to go- I need to get value for money out of my drill after all!

So what are you up to this Bank holiday weekend? No doubt our kids will complain that they’ve got nothing to do but if we rush through it all to make sure we’ve got some time for a day out, no doubt they’ll also complain bitterly about having to go out. That’s the way with kids and we’ve just got to get on with it I suppose!

 

Is Trump right- are video games training our kids to be killers?

In the wake of the Florida school shooting it seems that the gun control laws are in the spotlight again. And so are violent video games, in what a cynic might think is an attempt to shift the blame to an area that’s not directly funding the Republican Party.

Still, cynicism aside, it is worth asking the question of whether video games are training our kids to be killers in a fair and objective manner, even if the common sense approach might be to think that participating in video game related violence might at best desensitise one to violence, at worst lead one to act out the content of a violent game. Common sense is all very well but it really does need to be backed up and supported by empirical research if we’re going to base policy on it.

This is the cherry picked highlight reel of violence in video games that the White House put together. I would strongly suggest if you are of a squeamish disposition do not watch it. View Full Post

Getting some practical help from AXA PPP healthcare in facing my own fears!

Now I’m facing my fears with the help of AXA PPP healthcare, I’m actually facing my fears with help from AXA PPP healthcare– I spent an hour on the telephone with one of their physiologists who is also a mental health first aider. It’s all very well girding your loins and setting your goals but sometimes you need a bit of help in facing, what many perceive to be, the peril. In this instance, my peril, in inverted commas, is the fear that I’ll have a premature death and leave my family to cope without a dad or husband (the kids without a dad, my wife without a husband before you get any funny ideas). Rather than thinking of this fear as a peril, I can harness it positively, by taking steps to improve my fitness and with a healthier diet.  Unlike Sir Galahad, who obviously needed no help facing the peril:

Lancelot:You were in great peril.
Galahad: I don’t think I was.
Lancelot: Yes, you were. You were in terrible peril.
Galahad: Look, let me go back in there and face the peril.
Lancelot: No, it’s far too perilous.
Galahad: Look, it’s my duty as a knight to sample as much peril as I can.

If there’s one thing I’m never backwards in coming forward about it’s talking about myself and the AXA professional Becky was super awesome in focusing the Alex stream of consciousness into the areas that needed it the most. In fact by the end of our session I was in full on Galahad mode and wanting to face the peril, no matter how perilous. It’s funny how some external input can really help you harness the positive potential of those fears full on isn’t it?

We worked through my issues, which were a mixture of diet, exercise and a lot of apathy, and Becky came up with a three point plan:

  1. Reduce weight to less than 100kg – as you mentioned breaking this number is a big barrier psychologically. Don’t forget you have already dropped a trouser size through the addition of walking to work so you are well on your way to achieving this.
  2. Increase activity level, keep up with football and walking to work but build core strength too. Could you link this with the children as supports, just like running with your 9 year old, could you find an activity to do with the others once a week too?
  3. Improve the quality of your diet, specifically lunches when you are away from your wife. Don’t worry too much about calories, let’s look into nutritious rich foods. Take leftover dinners to work or cook yourself something – don’t forget you enjoy cooking so hopefully this will be a positive aspect of routine rather than a chore. Planning is key here!

Right now my knees are aching something rotten; I played five a side last night and by the end of it was really beginning to suffer (I am 43 and overweight!) but I was still out today racking up the steps. And while steps don’t mean prizes, they do mean kilometres, and in the long run the prize is conquering my fear of an early departure from this mortal life, so I suppose it is a prize in a way. I walked to work so fast on Tuesday that the GPS assisted activity tracker I was using categorised it as a run rather than walking! Every time I feel like dawdling on my walk to work, I think about lying in bed worrying how my kids would cope with everyday growing up milestones- transitioning to secondary school, sitting their GCSEs, getting a first girlfriend or boyfriend- without me there to help them along the way. To be honest it’s still very easy to lay awake at night with those worries but I am at least utilising that fear to drive me on to a healthier me.

I was particularly impressed with some of the tools and resources AXA PPP healthcare gave me to help with this progress. There is a great resource called Food for Thought that Becky emailed me that not only did the normal sort of “eat brown bread because it’s better for you” jazz, but also had a mood & food diary, with specific minerals and foodstuffs that could help improve your state of mind. I never knew that processing alcohol, your body uses thiamin, zinc and other nutrients and this can deplete your reserves, especially if your diet is poor.

After my first hour consultation, I get 20 minutes a month to catch up to make sure I’m still on track. This weekend, I’m following advice and taking the kids for an excessively long cross country hike followed  by a nice swim to warm us all up!

To find out how fears can hold us back and watch a video by leading psychologist, Dr Mark Winwood, about ‘How to set your fear’ so you can turn it into a motivating tool, visit AXA PPP healthcare’s Own Your Fears website: www.axappphealthcare.co.uk/ownyourfears.

Nozstock 20: headliners announced!

Nozstock: The Hidden Valley celebrates its 20 th anniversary this summer!

  • The festival is very proud to announce its first artists, including headliners Chase & Status (DJ set + Rage), Goldfrapp and Grandmaster Flash
  • Live performances from The Selecter, Dub Pistols, Electric Swing Circus, Kiko Bun, The Lovely Eggs, Oh My God! It’s The Church and DJ sets from DJ Marky & G.Q, Black Sun Empire, S.P.Y, Audio, Dillinja, Randall and many more
  • The theme for the 20 th anniversary is Nozstalgia – anything from Gameboys and Ghostbusters to the Karate Kid and flared jeans
  • Festival takes place across an idyllic working farm set in beautiful countryside
  • Little Wonderland Kids’ Area returns with plenty of fun, magic and inspiration for children of all ages and their families – and it’s all free!
  • Nozstock runs from Fri 20 th – Sun 22 and July 2017
  • Tickets from £120 for adults / from £95 for 13-16 year olds / 12 and under free payment by instalment is available
    For full festival info go to: www.nozstock.com
  • Check out the festival’s video here

This summer Nozstock: The Hidden Valley celebrates its 20th anniversary, entering a small group of
festivals who have reached two decades of creating magic each summer. It’s a huge achievement for the
family-fun festival which is set across their working farm in the rolling hills of Herefordshire. It is an
event which has grown from a group of like-minded friends gathered together many years ago into a truly
mesmeric experience of wonder and enchantment for all the ages, including the return of the Little
Wonderland Kids’ Area – a huge family favourite.

Nozstock The Hidden Valley’s Little Wonderland Kids’ Area features a vibrant spectrum of children’s
entertainment for everyone to enjoy, which will be linked into this year’s theme of Nozstalgia. The festival
embraces a whole family festival experience from beginning to end, and this is a friendly welcoming
environment for both parents and little ones alike. All are welcome to get creative, be amazed by
wondrous stories, sculptures and entertainment, or roll their sleeves up for some physical fun. All events
and activities are free of charge in the Little Wonderland Kids’ Area across the whole weekend, as the
festival always strongly believes families shouldn’t foot the bill for festival fun. There’s even a bottle
warming service!

Click for bigger

Ella Nosworthy, who runs Nozstock with her father, says: “No-one is more surprised than us that we’ve
made it to our 20th birthday! We’re planning our biggest show ever to make it a real celebration, and we’re sure that anyone who has been to the festival will not want to miss this summer! We’ve bought back
some of our favourite and most memorable artists from the past 20 years. Our Nozstalgia theme is
whatever you feel fond about from the past. There’s lots of inspiration to get really creative!”

The Nozstock team are incredibly proud to be revealing the first round of artists joining them for their
momentous birthday celebrations. As ever, it’s a kaleidoscopic mix of headline names, up and coming
talent and seasoned stars forming an incredible range of styles across the event’s ten intimate stages.
Headlining The Orchard, electronic floor fillers Chase & Status are one of the most successful acts
associated with drum and bass, with multi-platinum albums, numerous charting singles, and working with
the likes of Rihanna. Electronic pop duo Goldfrapp are an enchanting force, releasing iridescent,
intriguing pop since 1999 across 7 highly respected albums. The Selecter are a 2-Tone ska band featuring
a racially diverse and politically charged line-up, whilst over a 20-year career the Dub Pistols have
worked with heroes like The Specials and Madness. Electric Swing Circus is a 6-strong fusion of saucy
20s swing and stomping electro beats, and The Lovely Eggs are a lo-fi psychedelic punk rock band.
Next up are the The Stiff Joints, a 10-piece ska army with a raucous infusion of ska, punk and reggae,
and as Oh My God! It’s The Church encourage all sinners to join them, Mr Tea and The Minions
bring their gypsy flavoured ska and swing. Mad Apple Circus is an original blend of horn-fuelled styles
and Buffo’s Wake are gypsy punk lunatics with a taste for the macabre.

Over in The Garden, rap royalty Grandmaster Flash was a member of his ground-breaking hip-hop
group with the Furious Five and developed never heard before turntable techniques; he brings his
incredible party-rocking acumen to the stage. Speaking of legends, Chali 2na MC, painter and founding
member of hip-hop supergroup Jurassic 5 returns to The Garden alongside Krafty Kutz; the multi
award-winning DJ and undisputed King of Breaks. Nozstock fave DJ Marky has worked with Madonna,
and Fatboy Slim as well as releasing his own albums fusing drum and bass with full-tilt club beats and
laid-back house grooves, and hip-hop duo Taskforce bring street stories and psychedelic flows, whilst
living legends Verb T and Pitch 92 will bring an odyssey in rhyme and funk. The dextrous lyricist and
M.C of High Focus Records, Fliptrix brings his seamless semantics, Serial Killaz are drum and bass
jungle producers signed to Playaz Recordings and London reggae artist Kiko Bun is surfing a dubby
resurgence all the way to the top. Not forgetting Pengshui, made up of hip-hop heavyweights Illaman,
Fatty Bassman & Prav. The festival’s birthday celebrations will hit their peak with Saturday nights ska and skank party, headlined by Macka B, who after 30 years continues to tour the world and break down
barriers and with Sunday’s special 20 th anniversary drum ‘n’ bass party.

At The Bandstand Frauds are a post-hardcore band, whilst Average Sex have been snapped up by Tim
Burgess& label O Genesis Recordings. Elephants’ Grave stars Sonny Wharton; a firm fixture in the house and techno scene, whilst Dom Kane’s tracks have been supported by Pete Tong, Deadmau5, and more.
Dirty Secretz is one of house music & most exciting artists, releasing on Stealth and Whartone Records.
Friday nights welcomes Pro-Ject, providing the true house grooves, whilst in the daytime Ital Sounds
reggae collective are ready to provide the rocksteady rhythms.

The Cabinet of Lost Secrets features 7Suns’ music in an energizing blend of Afro, Latin, Caribbean, funk,
jazz and rock, The Pink Diamond Revue are an electro-punk duo who play in front of a big screen
projecting images they have cut up themselves from old B-movies, and Collective 43 are a multi-
instrumental congregation steeped heavy with New Orleans-street style and twists of blues and jazz. And
across the site there’s plenty more to choose from. Phil Kay’s unpredictable and freestyle approach won
him a Perrier nomination in 1993 and the award for best stand-up at the 1994 British Comedy Awards,
and Jayde Adams is a multi-faceted comedian of hilarious repute. The Wrong Directions Cinetent is
hosted by local experimental collective MASH Cinema, whilst The Sunken Yard are connoisseurs of a
very good time indeed. Puppetual Motion present a wide variety of visually stunning aerial acts and
Hummadruz are an ultra-violet theatre group dedicated to performing astonishing psychedelic spectacle.
Andrew Szydlo brings chemistry to life with his spectacular demonstrations, whilst the fabulous Little
Wonderland Kids Area keeps children of all ages enraptured throughout the whole weekend. A new and improved Craft Area wows with a chance to learn from the masters. Workshops on offer include
blacksmithing, spoon carving and plant propagation plus amazing demonstrations and communal
sculpture building with a fiery destiny…

 

Tickets from £120 for adults / from £95 for 13-16 year olds / 12 and under free / Booking fees apply /

 

Review: Catan the board game

I’m late with this review and the reason behind it is a bit silly. Catan just sort of looks intimidating. As someone who never really board gamed past the classics like Cluedo and Monopoly, even I’d heard of Catan because it’s such a big deal. From what I’d heard it’s a game that’s best with 4 players and can take around an hour and a half to play. That sounded a bit intimidating but I wish I’d not seen it as that because once we cracked it open with some chums, the game time just flowed by and we were all sad it was over; pulling out our phones to try and work out when we could schedule another game (pro tip- you can fit a game in during the average run time of a kids movie, even allowing for the interruptions down to complaints like “he looked at me funny”, or “he’s sitting on my private sofa”).

Catan comes with one of the best instructions booklets I’ve seen. Everything is illustrated with pictures, so there’s none of the usual Alex process of struggling to pick out the right meaning (I’m terrible following instructions- to me if a car says it needs servicing at either 10,000 miles or 12 months, I’d have it serviced when it hit 10,000 miles at 14 months).

The Catan board is a bit of a novelty, made up of large hexagons. Or is that hexagonal pieces? I’m going to stick with hexagons as it’s easier to type. Each hexagon is a different type of land, and every time you play they go together in a unique order, which gives the game a lot of variety. Each hexagon has different attributes assigned by a number between one and twelve, omitting seven, which is kept apart for something more sinister! We used the beginners set up, which sees each of the 19 hexagons (aside from the desert) given a number. Some numbers appear more than once, which comes into play when rolling the dice later in the game (it’s all to do with the probability of rolling certain numbers you see).

The Catan board fits together nicely as you can see from the game we played the other night:

Thankfully the blue sea border slots together nicely and makes it easy to put together, as well as being stable on a table.

Initially I felt a bit overwhelmed by the set up of Catan; there is a lot to do and think about, hexagons, numbers, villages, roads, resources and the Robber who starts off in the centre and moves whenever someone rolls a 7. But perhaps surprisingly, Catan is really easy to play for beginners. Each turn involves a roll of two dice, anyone who has a village (or later a city) adjacent to a hexagon with that number in it gets a resource card with the material shown in the hexagon. Using the above as an example, if I’d rolled a twelve, white (me) would get two crop resource cards as I have two villages next to the hexagon with a 12 in it. If other players have settlements around a rolled number, they also get resource cards, regardless of whether they rolled the dice or not.

The game is about resource management basically, trading cards for roads and villages and cities, you can also trade cards with other players when it’s your go. Being captain obstinate, nobody would trade with me as I was winning but I didn’t let that stop me!

The aim of Catan is to collect 10 valour points (each settlement type you can build gets you a certain number, as does having the longest road and the most knights). This effectively puts a timer on a game that is pretty open ended but it’s still not a quick game to play. Our first couple of outings with only three players still took almost and hour and a half (with constant tea rounds contributing to the running time no doubt).

Catan is easily the best game that I’ve discovered on my journey with the Board Game Club. It’s simple to set up, despite all the components, and allows for great interaction between the players. The ability to randomly place the hexagons makes for an almost unlimited landscape and the player interaction via bartering makes for an interesting twist too. This is a game that works as well over a couple of bottles of wine as it does several rounds of tea. It’s really great fun!

You can buy Catan from all good retailers, it’s RRP if £44.99, Amazon currently have it for £35.99.

 

 

I asked my kids for their favourite song and the results were gratifying

It’s a universally held fact that music was better in the day. It doesn’t matter which day you’re talking about, it was just better. Our parents complained about the rubbish we listened to, and no doubt their parents did too, just as we think most of the guff our kids generation is in to is rubbish.

So, over dinner the other night, preempting the 10 year old’s any questions session, where he likes to go round the table and ask people an either/or question, I decided to ask the kids what their favourite song was.

The boy, aged 10

I was impressed. I thought he might go for some Nerdest (they do songs based on videogames and are particularly popular on YouTube) or some bloke in a white suit with a plastic bin on his head called Marshmello but he actually picked Wonderwall by Oasis. Wonderwall is 23 years old now, and if a ten year old me had to pick a 23 year old song, it would have been from 1962 and probably If I had a Hammer by Peter Paul and Mary.

Fifi, aged 9

I have to admit I had no idea what to expect from my daughter. She quite often puts on My Old Man’s a Dustman by Lonnie Donegan, and does a little dance to it. Equally she likes current pop and rock. She initially gave one song but then changed it to another, so I’m going to include both here.

Dido I can deal with in the sense that it’s a nice song. Bobby Vee’s Night of a Thousand Eyes though?! It turns out her granddad gave her an iPod Shuffle that had both songs on it and those are the two that she really liked. How awesome is that? Not least because the Bobby Vee video is a bit bonkers.

Ned, aged 6

Although Ned has now progressed to the “confident reader, aged 5-8” section of Waterstones, getting things like song titles out of him still remains a challenge. And it was no different here as his choice was “the song with an elephant in the video”. That doesn’t narrow it down much, so we had to fire up the TV and let him browse the YouTube music videos. Just as well we did as I’m not entirely sure we’d have got to Paradise by Coldplay on our own.

There is something very cool about hearing a 6 year old sing along to pop songs.

The runners up

We spent the rest of the evening playing our favourite songs on YouTube, taking it in turns to pick a song out and make everyone else listen to it.

The kids came up with some great songs:

  • Bastille by Pompeii (or the aaaa,aaaa,aaaa song as Ned calls it)
  • Symphony of Destruction by Megadeth (the boy was born to this, it’s his anthem)
  • Wolves by Selma Gomez and Marshmello
  • The Chain by Fleetwood Mac
  • All the Small Things by Blink 182

And we had an entire evening without television!

The best thing about the whole impromptu music evening was the lack of really contemporary music, because lets face it, music today is rubbish

The Daddacool guide to attending the Royal Ballet

We went to the Royal Opera House to see some ballet at the weekend and I thought I’d share my top tips in case you want to seem some exciting ballet yourself as part of a programme of self improvement and culture. We love culture in our house, we’ve dragged the kids round more museums, galleries and theatres than you could shake a stick at in a no doubt stylised ritualistic fashion, and they’re even beginning to enjoy it now.

So without further ado, these are my top tips for attending the ballet with your children. Or without them, it’s entirely up to you. It’s cheaper if you leave them with their grandparents. Should that be a tip? Who knows…

  • If you have vertigo, don’t book the upper slips. They might be (relatively) cheap but if you have to spend two hours feeling the clarion call of the void pulling you towards a long drop to oblivion, it’s probably not worth it.
  • Take the time to find out how the ballet you’re attending is pronounced. For example Giselle isn’t pronounced like chisel and you’ll get some funny looks if you repeatedly get it wrong in front of people who aren’t in the cheap seats.
  • Take some time before you go to read up on the story. Ballet is at best interpretive dance and at worst just people prancing around on a set. What they dance doesn’t give much away of what is actually happening and I’ve yet to decode what a chap jumping up with his arms by his side, scissoring his legs frenetically actually means in the context of story/emotion or anything else.
  • Ensure you find out where all the toilets are and make sure any accompanying children have been toileted three or four times before the ballet starts. The seats are quite closely packed and the amount of tutting that will ensue if you have to get up during part of the performance is astonishing but rest assured, if you do have to go out, you won’t miss anything critical to your understanding of the story; it’ll just be some prancing about and funny jumping, which whilst nice isn’t critical to your enjoyment as the whole thing is made up of prancing about and funny jumping.
  • The ladies doing ballet get to do all the cool stuff and the men look a bit daft. All the chaps get to do is the aforementioned jumpy thing (like a posher form of Riverdance), some long strides and a few lifts. The ladies get to do all the spinning around, graceful jumping and stand with their leading foot at a funny angle.
  • The ballet we saw was around 100 minutes (with an interval in the middle), followed by about 2 hours of applause and bowing, presumably on a pre-agreed rota to give the performers a chance for a cup of tea or a wee, which meant that the troupe had about 45 seconds before they had to do the performance all over again for the next bunch of punters. Try to moderate your applause or your hands will sting and you’ll swear all you can hear is clapping for the rest of the day.

We had a lovely time, even if Ned, 6, asked in a loud whisper at one point when were they going to start talking because he couldn’t work out what was happening. There is also a nice sandwich shop round the corner that’s good for lunch.

Upcoming PS4 update will allow better parental controls

Up until now I don’t doubt that the Xbox ecosystem has been much better than Sony’s Playstation set up when it comes to parental controls for kids using their own profiles. This is however about to change quite dramatically, you can read the full details of this change and all the others, in the following PS blog:

Play Time Management

We’re introducing Play Time Management, which will allow family managers (and adult family members who are set as guardians) to manage PS4 playtime for child family members on family on PSN. Managing Playtime is easy; go to Settings > Family Management on your PS4, or log into your PlayStation account on your web browser from your PC or smartphone, to check and manage your child’s playtime each day. If needed, the family manager/guardians can apply playtime restrictions to make sure that the child is only playing for a set amount of time or within set playable hours. Notifications on PS4 will be sent to the child during gameplay so that he or she knows when they should save and quit. The family managers/guardians also have the option to add extra game time via their smartphone or PC. In addition, the family manager/guardians can choose whether or not to automatically log the child out of their PS4 once their playtime is over.

This is big news for parents, and finally lets us exercise the sort of control over access without it coming down to a fight every single time.

Heck, my most sure fire way of ensuring my eldest gets ready for bed usually involves me messaging him on the PS4 via the Playstation app on my phone, so the addition of another weapon to my arsenal that he can’t actually completely ignore is only a good thing.

The PS4 already has some good age related restrictions but being able to set time limits per day is a real killer function, even though I can see it leading to some tears and arguments. It’s a heck of a lot better than stealing the controllers and hiding them somewhere (and forgetting where you put them)!

MS already have a family timer on the Xbox One, so now I just have to decide the split between the two for the kids…